Kataoka Tamako

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Kataoka Tamako

History
About Kataoka Tamako

Kataoka Tamako


Medetaki Fuji, Kataoka Tamako
Medetaki Hyakuju no Fuji, Kataoka Tamako

Medetaki Fuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape

Medetaki Hyakuju No Fuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape



Medetaki Fuji Hyakuju no Haru, Kataoka Tamako
Botan, Kataoka Tamako

Medetaki Fuji Hyakuju No Haru
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape

Botan
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Flower



Medetaki Shirofuji, Kataoka Tamako
Medetaki Aofuji, Kataoka Tamako

Medetaki Shirofuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape

Medetaki Aofuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph + Silk Screen
Landscape



Kinjou no Akafuji, Kataoka Tamako
Medetaki Noutori No Fuji, Kataoka Tamako

Kinjou No Akafuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape

Medetaki Noutori No Fuji
Kataoka Tamako
Lithograph
Landscape


History

1905

On January 15, Kataoka Tamako was born in Sapporo city, Hokkaido.

1946

She studied under Yasuda Yukihiko.

1952

She was appointed to the "Dojin" of The Japan Art Institute.

1976

She was given the Orders of the Sacred Treasure.

1981

She took office as a director of The Japan Art Institute.

1982

She was appointed to a member of The Japan Art Academy.

1986

She was selected to the Person of Cultural Merits.

1989

She was given the Order of Culture.

2008

She passed away.



About Kataoka Tamako

After studying Japanese painting at Womenfs Academy of Fine Arts, Kataoka Tamako served as a teacher for over thirty years while vigorously developing her own art under the tutelage of such masters as Yasuda Yukihiko and Kobayashi Kokei. She was fond of the Ukiyo-e esthetic and eagerly adopted stylistic elements from the traditional Rimpa school of Japan and the postwar European movement of Art Informal, creating a unique and unconventional style of her own. Bold paintings, rooted in the earth and local tradition, have a rich creativity and forcefulness that make them stand out conspicuously in the world of modern Japanese painting circle.

She had used landscape as background to her figure paintings since the beginning of her career, but she began to concentrate on it as a main subject in the late 1950s and early 1960s. As she gradually developed a stronger interest in landscape, she became entranced with the oceans and mountains and came to see them as living things. This interest became a passion, and she traveled throughout Japan to explore volcanic mountains and experience their burning energy. She climbed many of these mountains, obtaining a physical experience of the atmosphere surrounding them in order to depict them in her paintings. Her explorations culminated with the most sacred mountain in Japan, Mt. Fuji. She was captivated by Fuji and its ever-changing appearance, and vowed to continue painting the mountain it until she died and her bones were laid to rest there.



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